bathroom in other languages 1

Bathroom In Other Languages

Bathroom In Other Languages

Example Sentences for bathroom I should have to get that bathroom and piano in any case now. Dahlia has conveniently placed a sofa outside the bathroom door. “Oh, please hand me something to put on,” came the voice from the bathroom. What I had commended as new and national was a bathroom in every bedroom. Together they walked to the kitchen, the bedroom, the bathroom. I opened my two-suiter and took out my toilet kit and went to the bathroom. But the pair had darted away, Mary into the bedroom, Jack into the bathroom. He tried to stick it on with soap from the bathroom, but that also failed. He never saw him and he would run to the bathroom and go to the icebox and get some ice, and didn’t like that. He went into the Executive bedroom, and on into the bathroom. EXPAND
bathroom in other languages 1

Bathroom In Other Languages

Be aware that bathrooms are not the same as toilets in some countries. Whilst it’s common to request to use the bathroom when you need to empty your bladder or bowels in North America, in other countries, the bathroom is where you go to have a bath in other countries, and there may not be a toilet or WC in the room you are directed to if you ask for the bathroom. If you are having trouble with whole sentences, then just say the appropriate word for bathroom. For example, if you are in Mexico and just say “el baño” or “baño” in a questioning tone, they will know what you mean and will point you in the right direction. If you want to impress your friends by saying things in a different language, choose one that sounds exotic, such as Mongolian, as opposed to a language so closely related to English, like Spanish or German. When using the Chinese dialects, have a lot of patience with the person you’re talking to, especially if you’re not familiar with using Asian accents. Chinese languages depend a great deal on intonation, which is not a major component of Western languages. In Polish it is easier to say: Szukam WC? ( shoo-cam voo-tze). In Hebrew, the ch in the word slicha is hard to pronounce, and might be confusing for the other person. It would be more understandable if you say just Sherootim.
bathroom in other languages 2

Bathroom In Other Languages

Tips Be aware that bathrooms are not the same as toilets in some countries. Whilst it’s common to request to use the bathroom when you need to empty your bladder or bowels in North America, in other countries, the bathroom is where you go to have a bath in other countries, and there may not be a toilet or WC in the room you are directed to if you ask for the bathroom. If you are having trouble with whole sentences, then just say the appropriate word for bathroom. For example, if you are in Mexico and just say “el baño” or “baño” in a questioning tone, they will know what you mean and will point you in the right direction. If you want to impress your friends by saying things in a different language, choose one that sounds exotic, such as Mongolian, as opposed to a language so closely related to English, like Spanish or German. When using the Chinese dialects, have a lot of patience with the person you’re talking to, especially if you’re not familiar with using Asian accents. Chinese languages depend a great deal on intonation, which is not a major component of Western languages. In Polish it is easier to say: Szukam WC? ( shoo-cam voo-tze). In Hebrew, the ch in the word slicha is hard to pronounce, and might be confusing for the other person. It would be more understandable if you say just Sherootim.
bathroom in other languages 3

Bathroom In Other Languages

I should have to get that bathroom and piano in any case now. Dahlia has conveniently placed a sofa outside the bathroom door. “Oh, please hand me something to put on,” came the voice from the bathroom. What I had commended as new and national was a bathroom in every bedroom. Together they walked to the kitchen, the bedroom, the bathroom. I opened my two-suiter and took out my toilet kit and went to the bathroom. But the pair had darted away, Mary into the bedroom, Jack into the bathroom. He tried to stick it on with soap from the bathroom, but that also failed. He never saw him and he would run to the bathroom and go to the icebox and get some ice, and didn’t like that. He went into the Executive bedroom, and on into the bathroom.
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Bathroom In Other Languages

Prepare by finding out which languages are spoken in the countries that you will visit. In South America, most countries speak Spanish, although in Brazil, Portuguese is the primary language.
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Bathroom In Other Languages

In the military, the navy, coast guard, and marines refer to the bathroom as the head, the reason being that in the olden days the bathroom was positioned at the bow of the ship. The army and air force refer to the bathroom as the latrine.
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Bathroom In Other Languages

I’m English, and agree with Robusto that I’ve never heard the phrase St. John’s. Although I have heard the room in question being referred to euphemistically as “The bathroom”, I believe this to be an Americanism. Unless the bath is actually in there, it’s a toilet, or a “loo” in more polite society. In my house the bath is in the same room as the toilet, so the room is referred to in our house as a bathroom, but one were caught short in a public place I would normally expect one to ask “where is the nearest toilet?” as opposed to “where is the nearest bathroom/washroom/restroom?”, although I’m certain their meaning would be understood. I don’t hear many people refer to it as a lavatory any more, although maybe that’s more a reflection on the company I keep. Certainly though some people refer to it as a “Lavvy”, which is just a reduction of lavatory. I certainly haven’t heard anyone in the south of England refer to it as a washroom or restroom, and I personally would not refer to it as such. Again, perhaps this is an American thing?
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Bathroom In Other Languages

I’m not sure what the original word actually was as most of today’s words are euphemisms or even, as bathroom, a euphemism to avoid a euphemism. I’m a New Zealander of British stock (parents still speak British and I lived there a while). It comes down to : toilet – a euphemism based on a woman’s morning ritual, then applied to the room and now to both the room and the bowl lavatory – means wash room and is a euphemism loo – from the French for l’eau (water) and is essentially a room with water, a euphemism. WC or water closet – a room provided with a water source, then applied to the actual apparatus. bathroom – a room with a bath in the whole world except North America where it now doesn’t need a bath and is used as a euphemism so that Americans don’t have to use another euphemism like toilet or lavatory. restroom/washroom – variations on bathroom heads – a boating term used for waterborne craft and naval land institutions, similar to galley (kitchen), brig (jail or cell), wardroom (dining room) etc. latrines – simple toilet especially in the military, often temporary and little more than a hole with a board above it. Now often used by the Army as a general term. Then you have the more vulgar, of varying vulgarity, terms such as dunny, bog, john, can, and even more vulgar crpper, shthouse etc. It appears that vulgarity begets accuracy.
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Imagine you’re with family or friends, and you suddenly have to use the bathroom. There could be a few different reasons you need to go to the bathroom. Maybe your nose is starting to get really congested and you need to blow it. Maybe your bladder or bowels are full. If you’re becoming really sick (and are unlucky enough to be around other people as it happens), you may even need to vomit.
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But of course, you probably wouldn’t tell your buddies the specific reason you need to go the bathroom. That would be rude… and gross. Instead, you’ll likely just tell them you’re going to the bathroom, right? It’s the polite thing to do, in the English-speaking world and in nearly all other cultures.
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Now imagine you suddenly need to go to the bathroom, but you’re not with family or friends. Instead you’re with a group of people you don’t know quite as well—co-workers, colleagues, classmates you just recently met…. In a situation like this, saying “I need to go to the bathroom” could still be seen as just a little bit rude or childish in the English speaking world (and in other cultures too). So even more polite, diplomatic language is needed.
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I’ve always been confused by the terms washroom, restroom, bathroom, lavatory, toilet and toilet room. My impression is that Canadians would rather say washroom while Americans would probably say bathroom or Saint John’s in the same situation. I guess the difference here is not only in different kinds of English, but also in whether one is referring to a room in their house or in some public place. Which do you usually use? Please specify the difference if you use more than two from those six with different meanings, and also where you are from (i.e. what type of English you speak).